Critically examine the relationship between different social groups and their religious beliefs and practice (33 marks)

2017 Words Nov 10th, 2013 9 Pages
Critically examine the relationship between different social groups and their religious beliefs and practice (33 marks)

There are significant differences between social groups and their religious beliefs and practice...
There is a very significant ethnic pattern in the participation of religion. The minority groups in britain are a lot more religious than the majority of the population (white christian) . For example, it is much more likely to find black christians(who make up 40% of the membership) in a pentecostal church than white christians...
In opposition to that, Modood found that while minorities have higher participation rates, there is a decline in importance of religion for all ethnic groups.
There are clear ethnic patterns in
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The under 15’s are more likely to go to church then other groups as they’re forced to do so by their parents. The over 65’s are more likely to be sick and disabled, thus they’re unable to attend. Higher death rates also make this a smaller group, which reduces the total number available to attend.
Voas and Crockett (2005) argue there are two main sorts of explanation fir age differences in religious participation. One argument is the ageing effect. This is the view that people turn to religion as they get older. For example using evidence from the Kendal project Heelas found people become more interested in spirituality as they get older. She argues as we approach death, we naturally become more concerned about spiritual matters and the afterlife, repentance of misdeeds and so on. Thus that age group is more likely to go to church. Another explanation is the generational effect. This is the view that as society becomes more secular each new generation is less religious then the one before it. Thus there are more old people than young people in church congregations today, not because they’re more attracted to religion as they get older but because they grew up in a time when religion was more popular. Voas and Crockett argue the generational effect is the more significant of the two explanations for age difference in religious participation. They argue that each new generation is only half as religious as their parents. Thus we can