Crossing the Chasm

76808 WordsJan 16, 2013308 Pages
CROSSING THE CHASM. Copyright © 1991 by Geoffrey A. Moore. All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. By payment of the required fees, you have been granted the non-exclusive, non-transferable right to access and read the text of this e-book on-screen. No part of this text may be reproduced, transmitted, downloaded, decompiled, reverse engineered, or stored in or introduced into any information storage and retrieval system, in any form or by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of PerfectBound™. PerfectBound ™ and the PerfectBound™ logo are trademarks of HarperCollins Publishers. Adobe Acrobat E-Book Reader…show more content…
It turns out instead they were a placeholder for the market tactics used during a merging hypergrowth market, a challenge covered in a subsequent book, Inside the Tornado. Also I have substituted a revised scenario process for the original to incorporate improvements that have evolved over the past several years of consulting at The Chasm Group. Elsewhere, I took a slightly new angle on creating the competition and, when it came to the section on distribution, I have done my best to incorporate the emerging influence of the Internet. But the overwhelming bulk of the changes in this new edition—representing about a third of total text—simply swap out the original examples from the 1980s with new ones from the 1990s. Surprisingly, in the majority of cases this swap works very well. But in other cases, there’s been a little forcefitting, and I want to beg your indulgence up front. The world has changed. The high-tech community is now crossing the chasm intentionally rather than unintentionally, and there are now competitors who have read the same book and create plans to block chasm-crossing. The basic forces don’t change, but the tactics have become more complicated. Moreover, we are seeing a new effect which was just barely visible in the prior decade, the piggybacking of one company’s offer on another to skip the chasm entirely and jump straight into hypergrowth. In the 1980s Lotus piggybacked
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