Essay about Culture Behind the Curtain

1931 Words 8 Pages
Despite voluminous effort from Communist Party Ideologists to stimulate this type of excitement and consumption of classical and folk music, Soviet youths remained uncooperative, preferring instead, the music of Western rock bands. No matter what they tried, the Soviets simply could not control the lives of their population any longer, especially with respect to what music and fashions were popular.
Rock music was already freely accessible from radio stations like Radio Luxembourg or the BBC, and dedicated rock enthusiasts lapped it up. “For westerners, it was music to dance to; for those in Soviet Russia, when you multiplied the Beatles’ youthful vitality by the forbidden fruit factor, it was more than a breath of fresh air – it was a
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Despite voluminous effort from Communist Party Ideologists to stimulate this type of excitement and consumption of classical and folk music, Soviet youths remained uncooperative, preferring instead, the music of Western rock bands. No matter what they tried, the Soviets simply could not control the lives of their population any longer, especially with respect to what music and fashions were popular.
Rock music was already freely accessible from radio stations like Radio Luxembourg or the BBC, and dedicated rock enthusiasts lapped it up. “For westerners, it was music to dance to; for those in Soviet Russia, when you multiplied the Beatles’ youthful vitality by the forbidden fruit factor, it was more than a breath of fresh air – it was a hurricane, a release, the true voice of freedom.” The Soviet Union recognized that they were fighting an uphill battle, and that there seemed little they could do to change the fact that rock and roll was preferred over socialist cultural activities, and though the Party would attempt to jam transmissions of this music too, by the early 1970s, rock culture began to be embraced by bloc governments who simply couldn’t quell the massive public demand for it. Zinaida Soumina, a Dnepropetrovsk official, explains, “The youth waited for when the fresh music records from the West would appear on the black market. Young people had forgotten their national roots, and their own national culture.” It had become clear that the soviet population wanted
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