Culture in Negotiation

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This article was downloaded by: [UQ Library] On: 09 September 2011, At: 16:52 Publisher: Psychology Press Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

International Journal of Psychology
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Culture and Negotiation
Jeanne M. Brett Available online: 21 Sep 2010

To cite this article: Jeanne M. Brett (2000): Culture and Negotiation, International Journal of Psychology, 35:2, 97-104 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/002075900399385

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This article develops a conceptual model to explain how culture impacts negotiation . It draws on previous research on culture and on negotiation to develop an understandin g of how culture affects negotiation processes and outcomes. The article begins with a review of fundamental concepts in the literature on negotiation and culture. These concepts provide a language for what we know and what we do not know about culture and negotiation and allow us to build a model of factors affecting inter-cultural negotiation process and outcome.

A MODEL OF INTER-CULTURAL NEGOTIATION Negotiation
Negotiation is a form of social interaction. It is the process by which two or more parties try to resolve perceived incompatibl e goals (Carnevale & Pruitt, 1992). In order to understand the effect of culture on

negotiation, it is useful to have a mental model of negotiation. What is it that people mean when they say they negotiate? What is involved in negotiating? What is a good outcome in negotiation? What does it take to get a good outcome? What goes wrong in a negotiation that has a poor outcome? However, if culture has an effect on negotiation, the mental models of negotiators from one culture may not map on to the mental models of negotiators from another culture, making the speci® cation of a single mental model problematic. There are two ways to approach this problem of specifying a mental
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