Daniel Defoe and the Apparition of Mrs Veal Essay

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"Wherever God erects a house of prayer, The devil always builds a chapel there, And't will be found, upon examination, The latter has the largest congregation" (Defoe, The True-Born Englishman. Part I. Line1). Daniel Defoe was a man of many beliefs, from political to spiritual he was complex in his values. He was roughly a merchant, soldier, factory owner, bankrupt, spy, pamphleteer, convict, journalist, editor, politically disruptive writer, and novelist. However to this day, his life and works are an interesting and remarkable topic for the curious to delve into.

Defoe's upbringing can be described as none other than humble. He was born to a butcher named James Foe in Stoke Newington, London, England. His family was that of
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In 1719 he wrote, "Robinson Crusoe," a famous novel which tells of a man's shipwreck on a desert island and his consequent adventures. This novel had two less famous sequels to follow. Another famous novel of Defoe's was Moll Flanders, a charming first person narrative of the fall and redemption of a 17th century English woman. She appears to be an immoral adulteress, but she manages to keep the readers sympathy throughout the novel. (Knowledgerush) Defoe surprisingly continued to write all the way through his last days. There is not much known about his last few months, but it is suggested that his family was distressed and he felt the need to separate from them and take refuge in London. He died on April 26, 1731 of a lethargy at his lodgings in Ropemaker's alley, Moorfields. Despite the many unknown facts about his last years his many writings carry on his legacy. (Bartleby)

One of his more significant works titled, "A True Relation of the Apparition of Mrs. Veal," has turned out to be more controversial than just a, " . . .widely popular ghost story" (Rogers 1). The entire title of this short `ghost' story being, "The True History of the Apparition of One Mrs. Veal the next day after her Death to a one Mrs. Bargrave, at Canterbury, the eighth of September 1705." Although the title may be quite self