Death "We Real Cool"

890 WordsApr 28, 20084 Pages
Death in “We Real Cool” In Gwendolyn Brooks poem “We Real Cool” Seven African-American high school dropouts want everyone to admire them. These teenagers explain how they stay out late playing pool, fighting, sinning and drinking. Though they believe they have everybody else fooled, they know themselves that the destructive behavior they are taking part in will lead to their death. “The sluggard’s carving will be the death of him, because his hands refuse to work” (Proverbs 21:25) The Bible makes a very clear statement in this passage as to how being lazy can be the cause of one’s death. In “We Real Cool,” Gwendolyn Brooks uses denotation and sound devices to suggest that although humans may often think of themselves as being cool for…show more content…
It is sad to see how these teenagers think of themselves as being cool because of the activities they choose to do, when they each see how it is making them live a shorter life and none of them are doing a thing about it. Life is worth more than feeling cool. Proverbs says, “Since they hated knowledge…the waywardness of the simple will kill them, and the complacency of fools will destroy them” (Proverbs 1:29a, 32). The teenagers in “We Real Cool” have an image of their selves as being cool on the outside because of the badly behaved things they are taking part in and want others to think them as being cool. These teenagers want to think that they are cool for doing the things they do, but they know that the destructive life they live will soon be a factor to their deaths. Brooks demonstrates in “We Real Cool” that even though people acknowledge their own behavior and think of themselves as being cool, their destructive ways will be a part of their short lives and none of their coolness will ever matter again. Works Cited The Bible. New International Version. Brooks, Gwendolyn. “We Real Cool.” Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X.J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia. 6th ed. New York: Harper, 1995.
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