Death of Salesman by Arthur Miller

972 Words Jul 10th, 2018 4 Pages
In the play Death of a Salesman by the playwright Arthur Miller, the use of names is significant to the characters themselves. Many playwrights and authors use names in their works to make a connection between the reader and the main idea of their work. Arthur Miller uses names in this play extraordinarily. Not only does Miller use the names to get readers to correlate them with the main idea of the play, but he also uses names to provide some irony to the play. Miller uses the meanings of some of the names to tie in the characteristics of the characters. Willy, the protagonist of Miller’s play, has a brother, Ben. Ben is much older and long dead when this play begins. Ben, or Benjamin, is a religious name that refers to the “Son of the …show more content…
He has an apartment, a job, and all the women he could dream of, but he remains deeply saddened. Happy hints his sadness early in the play
And I know what the hell I’m workin’ for. Sometimes I sit in my apartment all alone. And I think of the rent I’m paying. And it’s crazy. But then, it’s what I always wanted. My own apartment, a car and plenty of women. And still, goddammit, I’m lonely. (23; Act 1)
All of this sadness builds up inside of Happy and he strives for attention. He is constantly trying to achieve his dad’s attention by saying, “I’m losing weight, you notice Pop” (29; Act 1)? Happy always tells his family he is going to get married also. He continues telling he is going to get married to put a mask of happiness over his feelings of inadequacy.
The name Bernard corresponds with a nerd’s name. Bernard, the son of a neighbor, Charley who ends up loaning the Loman’s money and standing by Willy, is a nerd and has a name that collaborates well with his personality. After Bernard tries helping Biff not fail math Willy says, “Don’t be a pest, Bernard! What an anemic!” (33; Act 1). Bernard may have been a nerd, but now he is a very successful lawyer. Charlie boasts about Bernard’s success to Willy “How do you like this kid? Gonna argue a case in front of the Supreme Court” (95; Act 2).
On the other side of the spectrum the Loman or “Low man” family refers to the class of the family. The Loman’s are not successful and
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