Deception in the Investigative, Interrogative, and Testimonial Processes

1606 Words Mar 27th, 2010 7 Pages
Deception in the Investigative, Interrogative, and Testimonial Processes
Lisa Moore
University of Phoenix
Ethics in Justice and Security
CJA 530
March 23, 2010
Roger Long J.D.

Deception in the Investigative, Interrogative, and Testimonial Processes The term deception means the deliberate act of misleading an individual some may refer to deception as “little white lies.” Deception has long been used in the criminal justice area by officers in the detecting process of criminal cases, and is one of the most commonly used tools in the investigative process. Investigators use deception in the detecting process. This involves misleading criminals during the investigative and interrogative stages, to gather enough information about the
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What the investigator did not tell the suspect was that the video only showed him concealing the stereo and nothing else” (Obenberger, 2008). “Testimonials during court hearings are performed under oath, hence the statements of an individual being examined are assumed to be true and no other statement should be falsified or forged. When the officer does not pronounce the truth in court, he or she is still capable of providing a reason for his deception, based on a substitute arrangement, such as when he or she is operating as a witness to the prosecution and is not considered as the defendant in a court case. However, it is also required that the officer is conscious of the rules of the court system that he or she has sworn to tell the truth during examination” (Chevigny , 1969). “It is difficult to prove a causal relationship between permissible investigative and interrogatory deception and testimonial deception. Police freely admit to deceiving suspects and defendants. They do not admit to perjury, much less to the rationalization of perjury. There is evidence, however of the acceptability of perjury as a means to the end of conviction. The evidence is limited and fragmentary and is certainly not dispositive” (Skolnick, 1982). “Deception is nothing more than planting a seed and letting the suspect fill in the blanks. The most important part of using this

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