Dehumanization In Night By Elie Wiesel

821 WordsDec 24, 20174 Pages
How are Jews supposed to live normally when every human being around them, including other Jews, are fighting against them? Due to dehumanization, the survivors of the Holocaust are as lifeless as the victims psychologically. It is nearly impossible that after experiencing a traumatic event such as Holocaust to feel normal again, to feel like a human again. Throughout history and in the book Night by Elie Wiesel, it is evident that gentiles did not care about the Jewish nation. Moreover, not even the Jewish people stick together and cared for one another. Thus the Jews ceased to feel like human beings during and after the Holocaust. Over the course of history, many people from many nations dehumanized the Jews. In the book Night, Jews were treated as if they were not humans. When Dr. Mengele sorts Wiesel and his father in Birkenau, Wiesel says that “[they] did not know, as yet, which was the better side, right or left, which road led to prison and which to the crematoria” (Wiesel 32). When being questioned by Dr. Mengele, he only asks only for his age, health, and profession to seek whether Wiesel would be a good candidate as a slave or should be exterminated immediately upon arrival in the crematorium. The doctor does not stop to consider that Wiesel is a human being. Throughout Europe, many Europeans refused to help Jews, in fact, more Germans killed Jews than saved them (Gutman and Schatzker 227-228). Hitler was not alone in massacring millions of Jews. Once the Nazi regime rose to power, their first step was to wipe out all traces of the Jewish nation (Gutman and Schatzker 39-40). After the Holocaust, anti-Semitism was nevertheless strong and many Jews did not want to return home. For example, Jews from Poland were still dealing with pogroms, such as the progrom in Kiele in 1946, where at least 42 Jews were killed (United States Holocaust Memorial Museum). Jewish communities such as Lodge, Poland were destroyed. Homes that were not destroyed were stolen by neighbours and locals. Children that survived were often left orphaned and those who went into hiding did not remember their parents (The Holocaust Survivor Memoirs Program). Because of the dehumanization Jews faced from leaders and fellow citizens,
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