Depending On Who They Talk To, People Often Treat Others

1484 WordsMar 13, 20176 Pages
Depending on who they talk to, people often treat others differently depending on who they are, developing their relationships in either a positive, or negative way. Who you talk to, and live with can also affect how you develop as a person; when children are young, they are often taught many things from the adults, and role models around them. However, as that child gets older, they may begin to act differently, suddenly deciding things for themselves, which can affect the previous relationships between that child, and their caretakers. The same can be said for the main character of Hamlet, in William Shakespeare’s play of the same name. Before the play takes place, most of the characters Hamlet is already familiar with, with much being…show more content…
In a journal entry called, Gender Tragedies: East Texas Cockfighting and Hamlet, the writer, Barney Dews writes about how, much like Hamlet’s father, his father and grandfather gave him examples of how to be a man, however, on the other side, the females of his family were giving him a counter message of sorts. Dew continues by stating, “ When I read the play, I began to identify with Hamlet, to see him as the product of a society similar to my own. We both received irreconcilably mixed messages about gender.” This is very similar to what Hamlet struggles with throughout the play. When Hamlet sees the ghost of his father, his father beckons him to seek revenge for his unrighteous death by his brother’s hand with, “If thou hast nature in thee, bear it not. Let not the royal bed of Denmark be a couch for luxury and damned incest,” (Shakespeare,81). While he states this though, it comes out as more of a challenge of Hamlet, as if questioning his son if he could do it or not. Hamlet’s relationship with his father after his death is very complicated one, as he looks up to him, but seems to be a bit indecisive with his father’s strengths and teachings, as he hesitates to murder his uncle, when he has several chances to do so, using the excuse of him not being in the middle of a sin. Moore 3 Hamlet’s relationship with his mother drastically changes throughout the play. Originally, Hamlet and his mother were presumably close before his
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