Desiree's Baby And The Story Of An Hour Essay

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Everyone makes poor decisions in their life that later has an effect on them. In three short stories by Kate Chopin, she explains how many people often make irresponsible decisions which eventually leads to dissatisfaction. With this in mind, the story Regret discusses how a woman rejected a proposal to live a life she later regretted. Including, Desiree’s Baby, which depicts how a young man decided to send his wife and child elsewhere because of their race. In addition to, The Story of An Hour describes how a woman puts herself through misery while trying to cope with her husband’s death. Kate Chopin reveals different aspects of these character’s lives that all respond in one common way, the remorse for their decisions. In the story Regret,…show more content…
Although, the father, whose race was Creole, did not love the baby who was a mulatto because he did not understand his own race. Desiree, on the other hand, was Caucasian, yet after Armand saw the baby’s appearance, he accused his wife of not actually being white and sent the baby and Desiree away. Afterwards, Armand burned anything that reminded him of Desiree, in which he found a box of letters that his mom once sent to his dad that read: "But above all," she wrote, "night and day, I thank the good God for having so arranged our lives that our dear Armand will never know that his mother, who adores him, belongs to the race that is cursed with the brand of slavery." As a result, Armand now knows his ethnic background and perhaps feels bitter about how he treated his son and…show more content…
As Louise stares into nature, she begins to reminisce about the great moments of her marriage, but she instantly realizes that now she is independent without anyone to hold her down. Even though Louise loved her husband dearly, she is now ecstatic and decides to ignore everyone to think of the life that she is planning ahead because she is now free. The last paragraph in the short story, The Story of An Hour states, “Someone was opening the front door with a latchkey. It was Brently Mallard who entered, a little travel-stained, composedly carrying his grip-sack and umbrella. He had been far from the scene of the accident, and did not even know there had been one. He stood amazed at Josephine's piercing cry; at Richards' quick motion to screen him from the view of his wife.” Given that, Mr. Mallard was not dead, but Louise had suddenly died due to a heart disease of being exceptionally happy thinking that now with Brently dead she could be
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