Devastating Nature in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Essay

815 Words 4 Pages
One’s nature has always influenced his or her actions. Everyone has his or her unique attitude but there are different attributes that make up one’s attitude. Arrogance, overconfidence, greed, selfishness, selflessness, benevolence, and fear are among these attributes. In the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley empowers her characters with these attributes. In the gothic novel Frankenstein, the character Victor creates a creature in order to fulfill his ambitions. This creature is abandoned by Victor, which causes the creature to be overwhelmed with loneliness. Everyone judges the creature by his appearance and this causes the creature to disdain his master. The creature murders Victor’s family and later both of them duel each other in order …show more content…
One’s nature has always influenced his or her actions. Everyone has his or her unique attitude but there are different attributes that make up one’s attitude. Arrogance, overconfidence, greed, selfishness, selflessness, benevolence, and fear are among these attributes. In the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley empowers her characters with these attributes. In the gothic novel Frankenstein, the character Victor creates a creature in order to fulfill his ambitions. This creature is abandoned by Victor, which causes the creature to be overwhelmed with loneliness. Everyone judges the creature by his appearance and this causes the creature to disdain his master. The creature murders Victor’s family and later both of them duel each other in order to satiate their need of vengeance. In Frankenstein, Mary Shelley uses the characterizations of Victor and the creature in order to convey the idea that those who are overwhelmed with ignorance and arrogance are bound to experience sorrow. First, Shelley characterizes Victor as an ignorant man to convey the idea that ignorance leads to sorrow. In the following passage, Victor is informing Walton of how he had worked day and night without sleep; however, all of his hard work was in vain:
I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate for this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the
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