Diagnosing Miss Emily in William Faulkner's A Rose For Emily

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In William Faulkner's A Rose For Emily there is more than enough evidence to determine that Miss Emily is mentally ill. Most of the clues and hints are subtle, but when they are all pieced together the puzzle becomes clear. Not saying it is clear as too what Miss Emily was suffering from, the only way to know that for certain would be if the author or narrator told us in the text. We can conclude, however, she was suffering from some form of mental illness. Miss Emily was seen as a recluse and odd, but what no one in the town knew was that she couldn't help it there was more going on with her then people could see.
By the story’s conclusion, the reader can go back through the story and identify many episodes where Miss Emily behavior
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In William Faulkner's A Rose For Emily there is more than enough evidence to determine that Miss Emily is mentally ill. Most of the clues and hints are subtle, but when they are all pieced together the puzzle becomes clear. Not saying it is clear as too what Miss Emily was suffering from, the only way to know that for certain would be if the author or narrator told us in the text. We can conclude, however, she was suffering from some form of mental illness. Miss Emily was seen as a recluse and odd, but what no one in the town knew was that she couldn't help it there was more going on with her then people could see.
By the story’s conclusion, the reader can go back through the story and identify many episodes where Miss Emily behavior hinted at the fact she may be suffering from a mental illness. It can be seen that the town wanted to deny this fact and to keep her as a social idol. This information, in fact, could be used to support the claim that Miss Emily may have suffered from a form of schizophrenia as defined by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-IV criteria. Miss Emily could have developed this mental illness in response to demanding conditions living as a Southern woman from an aristocratic family. This turn to mental illness would have occurred because she was unable to develop healthy coping and defense mechanisms so her mind decide what to process and what to leave unknown. Her community viewed her as having a “hereditary obligation” (Faulkner 150) to
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