Essay about Dickens and his Stucture Of Hard Times

891 Words 4 Pages
“On every page Hard Times manifests its identity as a polemical work, a critique of Mid-Victorian
industrial society dominated by materialism, acquisitiveness, and ruthlessly competitive capitalist
economics” (Lodge 86). The quotation above illustrates the basis for Hard Times.
Charles Dickens presents in his novel a specific structure to expose the evils and abuses of the
Victorian Era. Dickens’ use of plot and characterization relate directly to the structure on account
that it shows his view of the mistreatments and evils of the Victorian Era, along with his effort to
expose them through literary methods. A befitting display of structure is evident through his
giving name to the three books contained in Hard Times. The
…show more content…
Reflection of this and Bitzer’s informative definition of a horse, as a child in
book one, occurs in book three as he speaks of the necessity of apprehending Tom Gradgrind Jr.
Sissy represents what Dickens is attempting to foster a desire for in the reader, imagination. This
is an aspect that the other children lack or are reprimanded for possessing. Another character
introduced to the reader is Josiah Bounderby, an acknowledged, self-made man. Following him is
Louisa Gradgrind, and her brother Thomas Gradgrind Jr. who are first shown trying to catch a
glimpse of Sleary’s circus, only to be caught by there father. Stephen Blackpool is brought into
the novel to represent the honesty, virtue, and commitment of the working class. “It is clear that
Dickens is speaking through Stephen...” and this sheds light on his idea of what is necessary for
life during those times. As the seeds are “sown” in book one the reader becomes aware of the plot
unfolding. The use of the characters takes not only an allegorical purpose, but that of relation.
The characters are endowed with intricate, human like qualities, so that the reader can better
relate. In book two, titled “Reaping,” Dickens uses the characters to continue to represent the
different aspects of the Victorian Era that he mistrusts. This is…