Difference of girls and boys in school

2194 Words Oct 17th, 2013 9 Pages
How do boys and girls experience school? Somewhat differently it seems, because their learning styles tend to differ somewhat. Although individual differences always trump gender-related differences, here are some differences between the ways boys and girls in K12 grades classrooms behave that have implications for teaching and learning. Girls are more likely to
Boys are more likely to
1. be good listeners -a trait that serves them well in today 's language-rich classrooms.
1. do well when using mathematical-logical thinking.
2. print neatly and follow directions carefully.
2. settle for messy handwriting and disorganized work.
3. sit calmly in their seats.
3. need space to spread out their materials; move around in that space.
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Boys’ teachers should sound matter of fact, even excited. Chadwell’s voice sounds much more forceful as he explains.
Chadwell continues. A boy’s autonomic nervous system causes them to be more alert when they’re standing, moving, and the room temperature is around 69 degrees. Stress in boys, he says, tends to increase blood flow to their brains, a process that helps them stay focused. This won’t work for girls, who are more focused seated in a warmer room around 75 degrees. Girls also respond to stress differently. When exposed to threat and confrontation, blood goes to their guts, leaving them feeling nervous or anxious.
“Boys will rise to a risk and tend to overestimate their abilities,” he says. Teachers can help them by getting them to be more realistic about results,” he says. “Girls at this age shy away from risk, which is exactly why lots of girls’ programs began in the private sector. Teachers can help them learn to take risks in an atmosphere where they feel confident about doing so.”
It’s an aha! moment for many of the parents, who seem to understand.
These differences can be accommodated in the classroom, Chadwell adds. “Single gender programs are about maximizing the learning.”
Mar. 5, 2008 — Although researchers have long agreed that girls have superior language abilities than boys, until now no one has clearly provided a biological basis that may account for their differences.

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