Differences Between Civil and Criminal Law

1159 WordsJan 14, 20135 Pages
ASSIGNMENT UNIT 8 – DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CIVIL AND CRIMINAL LAW [Your Name] [Professor Name] [Course Number & Course Name] [University/ College Name] Good day readers. Thru this essay, I will try to explain and point out the differences between Civil and Criminal Cases. The legal system used in the United States is based on common law and is divided into criminal law and civil law. The Civil law and Criminal law are two broad and separate entities of law with separate sets of laws and punishments, but a case can be heard and handle in both courts, State circuit and a Federal district court, due lawyers provide this options to their clients depending on the case, even that exists a number of differences between the two.…show more content…
| On a Criminal Case, the Government need to proof without a reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty of violate a statute protected by the government. The defendant retains the presumption of innocence until proven guilty by the state. | Penalties Imposed | Civil Case | Criminal Case | On Civil Cases, the penalties imposed are monetary penalties. This type of penalty is compensation to the party affected and his or her family. This amount of loss which is determined by the judge is called punitive damage. | On Criminal Cases, beside of a monetary charge to compensate the part affected, a punishment is imposes. This punishment is determined and decided by the court, and usually involves a stay in prison, a fine and in some occasion’s death penalty. | A criminal litigation is more serious than civil litigation, where the criminal defendants have more rights and protections than a civil defendant. Examples of Cases | Civil Law | Criminal Law | Landlord/tenant disputes, divorce proceedings, child custody proceedings, property disputes, negligence or malpractice, personal injury, etc. | Theft, assault, robbery, trafficking in controlled substances, murder, etc. | One famous case where the defendant was accused in both Civil and Criminal Law system was the case of O.J. Simpson. In the O.J, Simpson case, he was accused of
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