Differences in Competencies: The Associate-Degree Level versus the Baccalaureate-Degree Level in Nursing

1121 Words Oct 30th, 2013 5 Pages
Differences in Competencies: The Associate-Degree Level versus the Baccalaureate-Degree Level in Nursing
Grand Canyon University: NRS-430V | Nursing History, Theories, and Conceptual Model
06/09/2013

Differences in Competencies: The Associate-Degree Level versus the Baccalaureate-Degree Level in Nursing

Current trends in healthcare are leading to more complex, advanced patient care and needs. Hospitals and patient services are now in need of highly skilled, trained, and educated professionals to deliver this care. The impact of these trends extend into the profession of nursing, where employers are taking a closer look at the outcomes of patient care delivered by ADN graduates vs. BSN prepared nurses. Although
…show more content…
In the early 1900’s nursing education was primarily received at hospitals. Graduates mostly worked as private duty nurses, tending to wounds, bathing and administering medications. Others worked in hospitals where autonomy and leadership were considered insubordinate. During WWII nurses were once again at the bedside of soldiers and responsible for treatment decisions for the first time. This lead to once again, the need for highly trained nurses. The Cadet Nurse Corps program was initiated in 1943 where over 100,000 nurses received formal education and training (Travel Nurses Now, 2013). Nurses however remained in short supply post WWII across the United States. One response to the shortage, was the development of two year Associates Degree programs at community colleges. The ADN programs were cheaper, faster, thus making nursing a career possibility to a broader more diverse population of students (Creasia, Friberg 2011) In 2008 the National League of Nursing (NLN) conducted a survey of students enrolled in nursing schools across the United States. Fifty three percent of students were enrolled in ADN programs, forty three percent were in BSN, while the remaining four percent were in a Diploma of Nursing program (National League of Nursing Data Review 2010). The rate of completion of the ADN nurse has exceeded that of the BSN, creating a deficit in higher educated
Open Document