Different Versions Of Sleeping Beauty Stretch From The Middle Of The Renaissance Period

1106 WordsJan 23, 20165 Pages
Various versions of Sleeping Beauty stretch from the middle of the Renaissance period to contemporary settings. The Ninth Captain’s Tale by Arabian Nights is the earliest, recorded even before its 1550 publishing (cite). In Italy, Giambattista Basile writes Sun, Moon and Talia, which is the first record of the Sleeping Beauty tale in Europe. Charles Perrault’s Sleeping Beauty in the Wood revises the tale, making it more children friendly and most similar to the Brother’s Grimm version familiar with many children. Common throughout these stories, the princess character’s helpless nature is romanticized, not to mention the popular story of a prince finding a sleeping princess and the two living happily ever. Despite this fairy tale’s popularity, the several versions of Sleeping Beauty endorse a submissive and powerless female by establishing a surreal, magical setting around the sleeping princess character, dampening the alarming actions of the prince and systemic lack of female agency. Magical elements present themselves throughout each of these fairy tales. The princess character in each version is magically put to sleep or death. Perrault’s version has a fairy with a chariot of fire, pull by dragons. However, when the prince character is introduced, the description of the surreal setting around the princess is emphasized, primarily the princess character’s place of rest. In The Ninth Captain’s Tale, the mausoleum for Sittukhan is described as spectacular with “columns

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