Discipline And Punish Analysis

1330 Words6 Pages
outcome is within the realm of possibility. In Discipline and Punish, Michele Foucault discusses how institutions, more specifically how prisons, are modeled after the social order. Foucault describes discipline and how it was used to reinforce authority for those in a position of power. Discipline also encourages a certain code to live by;“WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH” (George Orwell, 4). The slogan changes truth and allows for the public to confuse their wants with the governments wants. The idea of rebellion is short-lived when one believe the Party’s way of life is the best and only way to live. This acceptable way to live is influenced by whatever agenda an institution of power has. Foucault suggests that discipline…show more content…
This ideology is similar to that of the party, which uses discipline to maintain power of its members by controlling every detail of their lives; “On coins, on stamps, on the covers of books, on banners, on posters, and on the wrapping of a cigarette packet- everywhere. Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you” (Orwell, 27). The figure of Big Brother is a symbolic political figure, controlled by the Party to allow for discipline through surveillance. This discipline allows for individuals to be coerced into conforming. The use of surveillance in 1984 is like Foucault’s mention of the Panopticon. Here discipline is enacted through fear by allowing those in power to observe others without their knowledge. The panopticon is a surveillance tool because…show more content…
Fear is derived from the fact that there is an omnipresent power possibly monitoring their every move. Foucault says, “the prisoner should be constantly observed by an inspector: too little, for what matters is that he knows himself to be observed; too much, because he has no need in fact of being so”. A totalitarian power seeks to exert influence by establishing the message that it is omnipresent and omniscient. This draws parallels to Winston’s comment, “There was of course no way of knowing whether you were being watched at any given moment. . . It was even conceivable that they watched everybody all the time. ”(Orwell, 3). To reinforce the power of the Party while remaining an omniscient presence, the use of surveillance and authority is crucial. The Party already has surveillance everywhere to investigate rebellious behavior. The most widely used form of surveillance in Oceania is the telescreen, a two-way screen which purposes include surveillance and propaganda. If something negative is said against the Party, it is recorded and used as evidence of “thought crime”, rebellious ideas. The thought police, also controlled by the government, monitors all surveillance and punishes anyone who has committed crimes against the Party. Crimes can include openly being verbal about your dissatisfaction with the Party to as minor as creating an appearance of not enjoying Party
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