Discuss the Postive and Negative Influences of Corporate Culture

4289 Words Apr 3rd, 2008 18 Pages
The culture of an organisation can be seen as a set of core characteristics that are collectively valued by all members of that organisation; and, corporate culture is believed to be a key element in the success of any organisation (Visagie et al. 2002). Schein (2004) emphasises that organisational cultures provide group members with a way of giving meaning to their daily lives, setting guidelines and rules for how to behave and most important, reducing and containing the anxiety of dealing with an unpredictable and uncertain environment. The aim of this paper is to provide a clear demonstration of appropriate theoretical frameworks in relation to corporate culture; with the concentration on analysing its positive and negative influences …show more content…
Their importance stems from the link they are assumed to have with the ‘deeper’ level of an organisation’s culture, of which they are generally thought to be indicators (Brown, 1998). Kemp and Dwyer (2001) specifies the six major types of artefacts that can be distinguished – rituals and routines, stories, symbols, power structures, organisational structures and control systems. These form the outer layer of the firm’s “cultural web”, Kemp and Dwyer (2001, citing Johnson and Scholes, 1997, pp. 69-74).

 Rituals and Routines: recurrent patterns of behaviour are a feature of organisational life. The routine ways that members of the organisation behave towards each other and towards those outside the organisation comprise “the way we do things around here”. The rituals of organisational life are the special events through which the organisation emphasises what is particularly important and reinforces “the way we do things around here”. The greetings of guests on arrival and the checkout procedure in a hotel are examples of routines. Rituals include relatively formal organisational processes such as training programs, appointment, promotion and assessment procedures, and so on.

 Stories: these have long been recognised to be an integral feature of organisational life. People tend to tell stories not just because the performance is itself enjoyable, but in order to influence
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