Discussing Widdicombe and Wooffitt's Suggestions in the Language of Youth Subcultures

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Discuss Widdicombe and Wooffitt’s finding that members of subcultures ‘resist’ being seen as members of such a group when approached in interview situations.

Within this essay I will discuss Widdicombe and Wooffitt’s suggestions made within their book ‘The Language of Youth Subcultures’ regarding resistance and will use the subculture example of punks to portray a clear conclusion. This book is about how different identities, both social and personal are established, maintained and managed within their everyday language. Widdicombe and Wooffitt seem to narrow in specifically on youth subcultures, particularly interviews with punks. We will look carefully at the language used by them to construct their identities and why they ‘resist’
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Discuss Widdicombe and Wooffitt’s finding that members of subcultures ‘resist’ being seen as members of such a group when approached in interview situations.

Within this essay I will discuss Widdicombe and Wooffitt’s suggestions made within their book ‘The Language of Youth Subcultures’ regarding resistance and will use the subculture example of punks to portray a clear conclusion. This book is about how different identities, both social and personal are established, maintained and managed within their everyday language. Widdicombe and Wooffitt seem to narrow in specifically on youth subcultures, particularly interviews with punks. We will look carefully at the language used by them to construct their identities and why they ‘resist’ being seen of members when approached in interview situations.

Language use is an important social activity within these subcultures and can show how resistance is a central theme among the participants. ‘Subcultures emerged in relation to dominant culture, reacting against blocked economic opportunities, lack of social mobility, alienation, adult authority and the banality of suburban life.’ (Haenfler, 2004: 407) Youth subcultures attract a lot of attention from media as the members tend to be highly visible and take part in activities that the categorised ‘ordinary’ people wouldn’t engage with. This subculture is studied to help express and explore the changes within society and changes within the future. In Harvey Sacks reading, (1984),
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