Disneyland History

1565 WordsSep 15, 20107 Pages
Disneyland 's History [pic] One day Walt Disney had a vision. It was a vision of a place where children and parents could have fun together. The more Walt dreamed of a "magical park," the more imaginative and elaborate it became. The original plans for the park were on 8 acres next to the Burbank studios where his employees and families could go to relax. Although, World War II put those plans on hold. During the war, Walt had time to come up with new ideas, and creations for his magical park. It was soon clear that 8 acres wouldn 't be enough. Finally in 1953, he had the Stanford Research Institute conduct a survey for a 100-acre site, outside of Los Angeles. He needed space to build rivers, waterfalls, and mountains; he would have…show more content…
Walt said: "All of us have a cause to be proud of our country 's history, shaped by the pioneering spirit of our forefathers. . .Our adventures are designed to give you the feeling of having lived, even for a short while, during our country 's pioneer days." Fantasyland was created with the goal to "make dreams come true" from the lyrics of "When You Wish Upon a Star." Walt said: "What youngster. . .has not dreamed of flying with Peter Pan over moonlit London, or tumbling into Alice 's nonsensical Wonderland? In Fantasyland, these classic stories of everyone 's youth have become realities for youngsters-of all ages-to participate in." Fantasyland would feature a large Sleeping Beauty Castle, and a Fantasy Village. Tomorrowland was created as a look at the "marvels of the future." Walt said: "Tomorrow can be a wonderful age. Our scientists today are opening the doors of the Space Age to achievements that will benefit our children and generations to come. . .The Tomorrowland attractions have been designed to give you an opportunity to participate in adventures that are a living blueprint of our future." Although, Walt had trouble working on Tommorrowland. He said that "right when we do Tommorrowland, it will be out dated." Walt Stayed close to every detail of the Park 's Construction, and he visited the site in Anaheim several times a week. Progress went sporadically despite exasperating obstacles. The Rivers of
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