Does Jodi Arias Deserve the Death Penalty?

946 Words Jun 23rd, 2018 4 Pages
Few trials have been polarized to the extent that the Jodi Arias murder trial has. There are several factors set out in determining the proper punishment in a case like this, but does this trial meet all the criteria? There is a lot of evidence to go over in respect to the Jodi Arias trial and much of it is very compelling, but do people understand the difference between a woman guilty of murder and a woman who is legally eligible for the death penalty. Many people do not recognize the boundaries between legal and personal belief when it comes to murder trials. People tend to have a preconceived notion of the crime committed and their own ideas regarding the death penalty, but not many people take into account the specifics that must be …show more content…
According to Arizona state law there are a few relevant criteria which must be met in order for someone to be eligible for the death penalty. The one that is of most interest to this case states that the crime must be committed in a way that is inhumane or doesn't take into account the suffering of the individual (ProCon).The death of Travis Alexander was thought to take up to two minutes as he was stabbed continuously, and his throat was slit. Could Jodi Arias possibly be gaining anything from the fact that she is not an unattractive woman? Although up to 70% of people living in American believe that juries are able to effective in criminal prosecution, 50% of people realize that jurors own personal prejudices can get in the way of fairly corroborating justice ("Reduce Jury Bias" A12). It is possible that her looks have could possibly sway a member of the jury, or cause a hesitance to convict her for the full strength of the sentence she may be facing. Even though Travis Alexander was shot in the face and then stabbed twenty-nine times, the jury was not entirely convinced that she deserved the death penalty. This would be seen as absurd to Wendy Murphy, who is a former child-abuse prosecutor and now an ad-junct professor. She was featured on HLN with Jane Velez-Mitchell and was quoted as saying, “Really, in the history books, there aren't many crimes more vile, more evil, more gruesome,more intentional, and more planned than
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