Does Restrictions Influence Perceived Problem Solving Abilities And If Those Who Prefer Less Restriction?

1573 WordsNov 3, 20147 Pages
Discussion The purpose of the present research was to investigate if restrictions influence perceived problem-solving abilities and if those who prefer less restriction would score significantly different on a problem solving inventory (PSI). The results of this study provided little support for the pre-experimental hypothesis. The current investigation utilized a standardized measure to increase validity. The aim of this study was the interrelatedness of perception and problem-solving ability. The PSI reliably measured perception of problem-solving ability. It may have had face validity, content validity, and criterion-related validity for this study, but it was not a valid indicator of other perceptional influences. Similar to…show more content…
For example, in the first study children were asked to sort using one rule and then the other immediately after. One could infer that the children struggled with the constraints of the task and as opposed to performance. Zelezo and Frye (1998) did not distinguish the task guidelines as an imposed restriction. They noted that young children lack the ability to psychologically-distance themselves from the concepts for a larger perspective of context. According to Luria (as cited by Zelezo & Frye), it had been a challenge to determine the reason for performance failure without a clear concept of the problem-solving framework in place. In the end, they decided to refocus their research efforts towards the influence perceptions of problem-solving ability had on executive function performance-tasks (Zelazo & Frye). The current research was a product of that reasoning; it questioned the influence perception of restriction had on both, respectively. The survey exposed participants to an inventory of perception that was presumably less restrictive for responses juxtaposed to the PSI. The participants were asked to prefer the restricted response or open-response inventory. The open-response section was only used for grouping and responses were not used in the scoring process of this study. However, in retrospect, this too may not have been a valid measure to establish the preference of
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