Does Technology Affect Students' Learning?

1337 WordsNov 4, 20126 Pages
Technology Changing How Students Learn, Teachers Say [pic] Nancy Palmieri for The New York Times Lisa Baldwin, a chemistry teacher, works with her students to fight through academic challenges. By MATT RICHTEL Published: November 1, 2012 http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/01/education/technology-is-changing-how-students-learn-teachers-say.html?src=me&ref=general There is a widespread belief among teachers that students’ constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two surveys of teachers being released on Thursday. Hope Molina-Porter, an English teacher in Fullerton, Calif., worries that technology is deeply altering how students learn. The…show more content…
In the Pew survey, which was done in conjunction with the College Board and the National Writing Project, roughly 75 percent of 2,462 teachers surveyed said that the Internet and search engines had a “mostly positive” impact on student research skills. And they said such tools had made students more self-sufficient researchers. But nearly 90 percent said that digital technologies were creating “an easily distracted generation with short attention spans.” Similarly, of the 685 teachers surveyed in the Common Sense project, 71 percent said they thought technology was hurting attention span “somewhat” or “a lot.” About 60 percent said it hindered students’ ability to write and communicate face to face, and almost half said it hurt critical thinking and their ability to do homework. There was little difference in how younger and older teachers perceived the impact of technology. • “Boy, is this a clarion call for a healthy and balanced media diet,” said Jim Steyer, the chief executive of Common Sense Media. He added, “What you have to understand as a parent is that what happens in the home with media consumption can affect academic achievement.” In interviews, teachers described what might be called a “Wikipedia problem,” in which students have grown so accustomed to getting quick answers with a few keystrokes that they are more likely to give up when an easy answer eludes them. The Pew research found that
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