Domestic Problems Of African Americans

2197 Words9 Pages
Abstract Living in the Southern parts of the United States since the end of the Civil War was not easy for people of color especially African-Americans. Because of a great deal of economic uncertainty, it was gravely difficult to attain financial security as well as be treated as an equal instead of a piece a property which had been the case for over three hundred years. Nearly one-fourth of all white Southerners owned slaves, and upon the backs of these slaves, the economic basis of America and much of the Atlantic world was constructed. In the several cotton states, one-third of all white income was derived from slavery. By the end of the Civil War and the abolishment of slavery, White Americans began isolating the ex-slaves. The…show more content…
New political, social, and economic systems emerged that transformed the South from a rural, slave-based society, to an increasingly urban, industrialized, free labor society. The changes to the social, political, and economic landscape of the South prompted an unprecedented era of racial violence throughout the region (Jett, p.40). The Southern states deemed slavery was crucial to safeguard white superiority. Most Southern whites who had aspirations of becoming a very prominent slave-owner, were terrified of a society with considerable numbers of African-Americans who were not slaves. Segregation moved by way of public accommodations, all the way through the South. DeFina & Hannon (2011) and others showed daily interactions of whites and blacks in the South, during reconstruction of the south identified racial prejudices were increasing steadily, after the Civil War and especially during the 1880’s. Town after town across the south flatly banned African Americans within their city limits after dark. Legal, political, social and demographic changes in the south made lynching dysfunctional as a source of control. Among other more delicate control mechanisms, modern housing segregation helped serve as a replacement to brutal racial oppression or even death. Jim Crow Laws The term "Jim Crow" laws were created from a character during the mid-nineteenth century. The white performers smeared a black cream their faces and mimicked
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