Don't Fight the Enemy in Night by Elie Wiesel Essay

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Fredrich Nietzsche once said, “Be careful when you fight the monsters, lest you become one.” This means that if a person isn’t careful, the evils that person fights against might be the very thing that person will become. This statement is valid and holds true in both life and literature. Night by Elie Wiesel supports the idea to not fight like the enemy. Wiesel uses setting and characterization to develop his story and to get this point across. Elie Wiesel uses the setting to develop his story. Night occurs in several different locations between the ghettos and different concentration camps. The year is 1944 when the story starts and Eliezer Wiesel is living in the small town of Sighet, in Hungarian Transylvania. Not long after the …show more content…
Fredrich Nietzsche once said, “Be careful when you fight the monsters, lest you become one.” This means that if a person isn’t careful, the evils that person fights against might be the very thing that person will become. This statement is valid and holds true in both life and literature. Night by Elie Wiesel supports the idea to not fight like the enemy. Wiesel uses setting and characterization to develop his story and to get this point across. Elie Wiesel uses the setting to develop his story. Night occurs in several different locations between the ghettos and different concentration camps. The year is 1944 when the story starts and Eliezer Wiesel is living in the small town of Sighet, in Hungarian Transylvania. Not long after the story begins, the Jews of Elie’s town are forced to live in small ghettos within Sighet. Soon after their lives return to normal, they are all herded into cattle cars and begin their journey to Birkenau, the gateway to Auschwitz. Within this camp, as the horrific acts ensue, Elie begins to question his faith even more than before. Many of the prisoners became chiefly concerned with their own survival, sliding into cruelty. After months of being in the camp, the Jews are evacuated when the Russians begin to advance. They went on a death march, running for more than fifty miles before they finally arrive at the Gleiwitz concentration camp. Upon arrival, they are promptly herded into cattle cars again to go to Buchenwald. The Jews that survive,

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