Drug Addiction : A Common Problem Within Our World Today

2567 WordsMay 13, 201711 Pages
Drug addiction is a very common problem within our world today. There are many factors that can lead up to drug addiction. Things like the environment that people live in, their peers, genetics could be a factor, and mental illness. One side is that drug addiction could be a disease or it could be that people believe that it 's a choice. With it being a choice means that people have to make the decision of what to do before they decide to take drugs or not. Arguing that this could be a disease is a side too. The side of it being a disease means that it could result in brain problems and it could be caused from having mental illnesses that may run in the family. This is about how drug addiction is a disease and not a choice. There is more…show more content…
Addiction causes brain changes. “A drug is any chemical you take that affects the way your body works. Alcohol, caffeine, aspirin and nicotine are all drugs. A drug must be able to pass from your body into your brain. Once inside your brain, drugs can change the messages your brain cells are sending to each other, and to the rest of your body. They do this by interfering with your brain 's own chemical signals: neurotransmitters that transfer signals across synapses” (Science Museum.org). Drugs are taken by mouth, injected into the skin and more.. Drug addiction can simply start out as taking medicine for cold or an everyday medication that is being prescribed. People tend to get addicted to their own medications because its easy access for them. Once they cant feel the medicine working the way it used to when it was first prescribed, people tend to abuse drugs. They will go find a drug that will simply suit the “high” they are looking for or wanting to feel again. “ The frontal cortex of the brain and underlying white matter connections between the frontal cortex and circuits of reward, motivation and memory are fundamental in the manifestations of altered impulse control, altered judgment, and the dysfunctional pursuit of rewards (which is often experienced by the affected person as a desire to “be normal”) seen in addiction, despite cumulative adverse
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