Essay on Dubinsky

2266 Words Sep 30th, 2013 10 Pages
Donna Dubinsky and Apple Computer, Inc.

Executive Summary Apple Computer was founded in 1976 and, a year later, released the Apple II computer which remained the major-selling product through 1985 In 1983, the company and cofounder Steve Jobs hired John Sculley as president. The Macintosh computer was introduced in early 1984 with impressive first year sales, although it was Apple II sales that carried the firm through the fourth quarter. By 1985, sales failed to reach projected planning levels causing profitability problems for the company and tension between the Apple II Division and Macintosh Division, led by Jobs. The relationship between Jobs and Scully was also beginning to strain.
Donna Dubinsky joined Apple as customer
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Dubinsky, however, strongly believed that the radical changes they proposed were a mistake and Weaver agreed. Initially, they didn’t take the JIT proposal seriously. However, in response to Jobs’ challenges, Campbell and Scully called for a distribution strategy review and recommended improvements by the end of the quarter. Dubinsky worked with Dave Kinser, controller for the distribution, service, and support group on a research project intended to defend the existing distribution system. Although she was unable to devote significant time and resources to the report, she was convinced that her experience, judgment and past record of effectiveness would carry more weight than Coleman’s radical JIT proposal. Nevertheless, intimidated by rumors of the sophisticated presentation being prepared by Coleman Dubinsky requested an extension as the deadline for her report grew near.
In January, Dubinsky learned that Coleman’s proposal would be presented at an executive retreat and was confused as to why she, as distribution manager, was not the one to address the topic. She rushed to prepare a counter-proposal for Weaver to present at the retreat. Campbell found the counter-proposal embarrassing and felt that the group hadn’t performed a thorough reexamination of the distribution process. Some members of the executive staff shared Dubinsky’s concerns over failing to involve her and, after much debate, it was resolved