During World War II American soldiers who were caught by the Japanese were sent to camps where they

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During World War II American soldiers who were caught by the Japanese were sent to camps where they were kept under harsh conditions. These men were called the prisoners of war, also known as the POWs. The Japanese who were captured by the American lived a simple life. They were the Japanese internees of World War II. The POWs had more of a harsh time during World War II than the internees. While the internees did physically stay in the camps longer, the POWs had it worse mentally. In the book, Unbroken, the POWs became delusional after being poorly treated at the camps. Even twenty-six-year-old Louie Zamperini had wasted his athlete body in one of these camps. Being POWs to the Japanese was not easy. The men were treated as if they were…show more content…
In Unbroken some of the POWs suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This was a disorder that caused the soldiers to have terrible flashbacks, anxiety, and nightmares. Psychoneurosis was the most common disorder that was among the POWs during the first six postwar years. Many of the soldiers also relied on alcohol after they came out of the camps. The POWs had stayed in the camps a shorter duration than the internees but their mental state was far worse. Even though the POWs were in the camps less than the internees, the POWs left the camps in a state that pretty much kept them from ever being sane again. It’s as if the POWs never left postwar. The internees were treated like they were invisible to other people. Many racists were surprised that the Japanese knew English and could talk. One internee said, “our years of isolation at Manzanar had widened the already spacious gap between races, and it is not hard to understand why so many preferred to where they were.” (Manzanar) Although the POWs had stayed in the camps for a shorter duration than the internees at their camps, the POWs had suffered from disorders that would keep them from being sane. The POWs were pretty much living with the fear of being in the camps again or being lashed at. As a POW said, “There was no right way to peace; every man had to find his own path, according to his own history. Some succeeded, for others,

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