Dylan Thomas' Do Not Go Gente Into That Good Night and Catherine Davis' After a Time

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Dylan Thomas' Do Not Go Gente Into That Good Night and Catherine Davis' After a Time In Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night" and Catherine Davis's "After a Time," there is a very clear concept of differences and similarities between the two poems. From a reader's standpoint, they seemed to be quite a bit more alike than dissimilar. Through an investigative analysis, "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" and "After a Time" were proven to be comparable in almost every aspect in poetry, such as structure, rhyme scheme, and meter. At a first glance, both poems strike as death related pieces of writing. That is where the contrast of the two is distinguished. "Do Not Go Gentle…show more content…
In the concluding stanza, one is able to see why the author has all of this anger built up - his father is dying. With this situation, he wants nothing more than for his own father to not go easily out of this world. In "After a Time," there is not much of a happy twist. This work, in simple terms, finds death and loss to be inevitable and repetitive. "All loses are the same" (Davis1414) is heard throughout this selection. In the author's viewpoint, we will go out of this world just as we came in - stripped. No matter how long and hard we struggle with the losses, these acts will come and lives will be claimed. All are completely equal in this life game, so it is not worth the struggle. This poem, in order to find a complete meaning, needed to be thoroughly examined by sections. The more death and loss that occurs signifies less that is still to come. In stanzas two and three, wit is discussed. One can use his or her wit to shame others, but that luck is unable to beat the game of death. One can rage as much as one wants, but in the end it is still all there. These facts are talked about in both stanza four and stanza five. The final stanza puts a quite depressing view on death. The author bluntly tells us to go gently because we will no longer need the things of today. Also, it expressed that all death is the same, and one will go out of the world just as he or she came

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