Dylan Thomas' style in Under Milk Wood. Essay

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Dylan Thomas' style in Under Milk Wood.

Dylan Thomas was born in 1914 and lived for many years in a small
Welsh town called Laugharne. He could speak not a single word of
Welsh. The piece called 'Under Milk Wood' was finished just short of a month before he passed away. It was commissioned by the BBC to be broadcasted on the National radio. This meant that it was broadcasted with no costumes, no props and no visual imagery to excite the audience. Dylan Thomas' radio play had to entertain the audience by the spoken word only. The style and language in Under Milk Wood is therefore very important. Under Milk Wood uses throughout the play an opaque and poetic style giving the listener an impression of fluency and flowing. We
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It is used as it is interesting and inspires the reader to continue. The songs sung are still in keeping with poetry but are quite close to the different styles that
Dylan Thomas can use to great effect.

Songs appeal to the ear, which is the basis of radio productions.
Alliteration is another aural device it is used through out the play in names and in the pro's. There is alliteration in one of the main characters name 'Captain Cat' putting alliteration into a name that has to be repeated many times makes the listener interested. "There's the clip clop of horses" "gulls' gab" and "the boat bobbing sea" these are effective and interesting and the continuing use of these descriptive words are among the very best poetic description that is used by Dylan Thomas. It is appealing to the ear and will prompt the listener to continue.

The technique of alliteration is sometimes joined by assonance.
Assonance also appeals to the ear and is used mostly in cataloguing.

"Arethusa, the Curlew and the skylark, Zanzibar, the Rover, the
Cormorant and the Star of Wales".

As it is the repetition of the vowel sound it is sometimes used as a substitute for end rhyme. Dylan Thomas has focused upon the fact that a list of names is more appealing then separate names.

Dylan Thomas also complements
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