Essay about Edgar Derby and Simon: Life, Beliefs, and Death

1586 Words 7 Pages
The lives, deaths, situations, and beliefs of Edgar Derby, from the novel, Slaughterhouse-five by Kurt Vonnegut, and Simon, from the novel, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding, are equally alike and unalike. Even though these characters are from different books, they represent the absurdity of death and the importance of speaking up for what you believe. Both of these characters live in hostile and confining environments, attempt to deliver a vital message, and are unfairly killed. Edgar Derby and Simon suffer dissimilar murderous, undeserved, and undignified deaths; however, the ideas and values that they stood for as well as the lives and experiences leading up to their sadistic deaths are similar in that they reveal the callousness …show more content…
The lives, deaths, situations, and beliefs of Edgar Derby, from the novel, Slaughterhouse-five by Kurt Vonnegut, and Simon, from the novel, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding, are equally alike and unalike. Even though these characters are from different books, they represent the absurdity of death and the importance of speaking up for what you believe. Both of these characters live in hostile and confining environments, attempt to deliver a vital message, and are unfairly killed. Edgar Derby and Simon suffer dissimilar murderous, undeserved, and undignified deaths; however, the ideas and values that they stood for as well as the lives and experiences leading up to their sadistic deaths are similar in that they reveal the callousness and cruelty in the human heart.
Although Edgar Derby and Simon lead incredibly different lives, throughout the novels, Slaughterhouse-five and Lord of the Flies, there are many similarities, including imprisonment and being encircled by death, in the situations that ultimately lead to their deaths. In Slaughterhouse-five, Edgar Derby and some other American soldiers are in a camp in Germany for prisoners of war, this captivity is the cause of the deaths of Edgar Derby as well as some other American soldiers. When Edgar Derby and the other American prisoners of war were put in the camp with the British prisoners, Kurt Vonnegut tells us that, “They could tunnel all they pleased. They would inevitably surface within a rectangle of barbed