Education and Australian Marginalized Groups

1101 WordsJan 30, 20184 Pages
“From the surface one may look upon Australia as being the ‘lucky county’ however when explored deeper Kayleigh Richmond came to the conclusion that this so called ‘lucky country’ isn’t all that ‘lucky’ for marginalized groups in Australia, the literature of these marginalized groups in Australia certainly substantiates this point”. Many sources of literature suggest that Australia is not considered the lucky country for migrants, indigenous and other marginalized groups of people living in Australian society. Privileged Australians would say that Australia is the ‘lucky country’ and for them it may be but it certainty isn’t for everyone. So, what makes Australia appear to be the unlucky country for marginalized groups in Australia? Is it the Australian Government that prioritises and praises the, so called, ‘privileged people’ or even just that their cultural values and attitudes differ from ours? Social exclusion is a part of everyday life, right? However how would you feel if a place you once called home, suddenly over the years began to exclude you and change the rules? Would you feel less of a person if your country stopped listening to you? In the 18th century approximately 40,000 years before the European colonization, 750,000 to 1,000,000 indigenous people inhabited in Australia. The Indigenous Australians have a complex oral culture and an admiration for their land and their spiritual values were based upon their admirations to the dreamtime (Indigenous People
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