Edward Snowden and the NSA Leaks Essay

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Edward Snowden and the NSA Leaks
Part 1: Objective Summary On June 6th of 2013 The Guardian reported on a classified U.S. surveillance network called PRISM. This information was given to them by former Booz Allen Hamilton employee Edward Snowden. Snowden obtained this information by secretly gathering files and documents regarding the program and others while working for the government contracted Booz Allen Hamilton in Hawaii.
On May 20 2013, Snowden had traveled to Hong Kong to meet with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, journalists for The Guardian, in order to turn over NSA documents revealing various U.S. surveillance programs and tactics that are used on their citizens and on citizens in other countries. Snowden had also given
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Ruth Marcus said in her entry, “Snowden knowingly gave information to a foreign source that put our country at risk, and that is unforgivable”. At another newspaper in the US, The Seattle Times Mark Weisbrot holds the complete opposite view to Marcus, saying, like Toobin, that Snowden is a hero that should be praised, not slandered. He makes his case on the basis that the data collected by the NSA had “over exceeded the power given to it” and that what the government was doing was “not acceptable.” Weisbrot believes in an individual’s right to say what is wrong with the country, and supports Snowden and whistleblowers for doing so. This issue also does not have party specific views as majority of the conflicts that arise in the United States do. There are democrats for Snowden as well as against him, the same views are split among republicans. In a speech at the University Of Connecticut Hillary Clinton of the Democratic Party talked about how she felt that the information Snowden released was helping terrorist organizations. (Roller)

Part 3: An argument in response
Edward Snowden has gone on record and said that what he intended to do was to help the American public realize a wrong that had been done against them. What he failed to realize ahead of time were the awful consequences that would arise as a result of his
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