Effect of Electronic Media on Children

4822 WordsSep 20, 201020 Pages
PERSPECTIVE Effect of Electronic Media on Children MUNNI RAY AND KANA RAM JAT From the Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Center, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160 012, India. Correspondence to: Munni Ray, Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatric Center, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160 012, India. munniray1@yahoo.com Radio, television (TV), movies, video games, cell phones, and computer networks have assumed central roles in our children’s daily lives. The media has demonstrated potentially profound effects, both positive and negative, on children’s cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Considering the increasing…show more content…
Ray, et al.(5) from India reported that children having exposure to violence through media had poorer school performance and its impact on their psychosocial adjustments was detrimental. Another study from India showed that vivid display of violence through media (9/11 terrorist attack) caused stress in adolescents(6). Yama, et al.(7) described that some of the fears, tensions, bad dreams and tendencies towards delinquencies of children are a result of frequent and a regular exposure to murder-mystery movies, and stories filled with violence and torture that children view on TV and movies. Association between TV viewing and suicidal behavior has also been reported from India(8). Both content exposure and screen time of media had independent detrimental associations with school performance in children and adolescents (9). Hopf, et al.(10) showed that the more frequently children view horror and violent films during childhood, and the more frequently they play violent electronic games at the beginning of adolescence, the higher will these students’ violence and delinquency be at the age of 14. Primack, et al.(11) showed that excessive TV viewing in adolescence is a risk factor for development of depression in young adulthood. TV viewing may play an exacerbating, if not causal, role in the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)(12). This hypothesis is consistent
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