Effective Approaches in Leadership Management: Nursing Shortage and Nurse Turn-over

1678 Words Nov 25th, 2012 7 Pages
Running head: EFFECTIVE APPROACHES IN LEADERSHIP MANAGEMENT:

Effective Approaches in Leadership Management: Nursing Shortage and Nurse Turn-Over
Grand Canyon University
Nursing and Leadership Management
NRS 451V
Billie Gabbard
August 25, 2012

Effective Approaches in Leadership Management: Nursing Shortage and Nurse Turn-Over
The United States as well as many countries around the world are experiencing a nursing shortage that is expected to worsen significantly. It is estimated that by the year 2020, if current trends in nurse employment persist, that only 65% of the nurses needed to care for patients will be available to do so; this is equivalent to a 36% deficit or 1,016,900 nurses (Huber, 2010, p. 576). This shortage will
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1-2). The estimated average age of a registered nurse for the year 2012 is 44.5 years (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2012, p. 3). Of great concern is the percentage of nurses expected to reach retirement within the next fifteen years. They account for nearly 50% of the current nursing workforce. Additionally, they take with them years of experience and knowledge that is needed train new nurses and to care for the increased acuity of patients and the growing elderly patient population (Huber, 2010, p. 597-598). Nursing schools across the country are struggling to increase capacity in the hopes of being able to meet the increasing demand for nurses that will result from the passing of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2012 (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2012, p. 1-2).
Nurse Retention and Nurse Turn-Over
One of the problems identified in the nursing shortage is nursing retention and nurse turn-over. The average cost-per-hire for a RN is $2,821.00 (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2012, p. 4). This is the amount of money the company will need to invest before that RN can begin to care for patients. What are the reasons that nurses are choosing to leave their current positions? The answer is very simple, “People don’t leave companies, they leave managers” (Valant & Company, 2012, ¶ 1). The saddening fact about this is that most managers are not bad people…