Effects Of Neutering On Golden And Labrador Retrievers

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The School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of California, Davis studied the effects of neutering on Golden and Labrador retrievers. They found that male Golden Retrievers with joint disorders is five percent in intact dogs and up to twenty-seven percent occurred in neutered dogs. Male Golden Retrievers with cancer is eleven percent in intact dogs and up to seventeen percent in neutered dogs. Female Golden Retrievers with joint disorders is five percent intact and twenty percent neutered. Female Golden Retrievers with cancer is three percent intact and fourteen percent neutered. Male Labrador Retrievers with joint disorders is five percent intact and twelve and one-half percent neutered. Male Labrador Retrievers with cancer is four…show more content…
Early-neutered were five and one-tenth for males and seven and seven-tenths for females. There were three times as many cases of lymphosarcoma in early-neutered males than intact males. Seven and four-tenths percent of females were diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma when late-neutered. Intact females were one and six-tenths percent while early-neutered females were one and eight-tenths percent. Mast cell tumors in females were two and three-tenths percent when early-neutered, five and seven-tenths for late-neutered and no cases for intact females (Torres de la Riva). Torres de la Rivas article explains the results of the study done on Golden Retrievers. This article will help me compare the chances of joint disorders and cancers when dogs are neutered early and late as well as intact. For example, I would use, “out of three hundred fifty-nine male dogs with hip dysplasia one hundred thirty-eight were intact, one hundred fifty-six were neutered early, and sixty-five were neutered late” (Torres de la Riva 5). Sixty-nine late-neutered, one hundred sixty-nine early-neutered, and one hundred twenty-two intact females were diagnosed with CCL (Torres de la Riva 5). Another example is: Three and thirty-nine hundredths of dogs with lymphosarcoma were intact and three and sixty-seven hundredths were early-neutered (Torres de la Riva 5). This article shows no matter the time a dog is neutered the chances of cancers and joint disorders go up (Torres de la Riva).

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