Effects on Heart Rate Before and After Exercise

2862 Words Nov 19th, 2011 12 Pages
The effect of exercise on heart rate

Word Count

THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE ON HEART RATE

Abstract - Aims - This study is to ascertain, if there is an effect on heart rate after exercise. This is being done to see, if there is a difference between resting heart rate and heart rate after performing exercise.

Method and results - The study was compiled of seven female students from the University of Huddersfield. For the exercise a step was used, a polar heart rate monitor was used for each participant with an independent assessor timing the participants, and recording the readings. Results of the study showed there was an increase in heart rate when performing mild exercise.

Conclusion – Exercise has an effect on
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The results of this test show that it provides a valid test to estimate aerobic capacity and shows there is a small measurement of error. A polar heart rate monitor was used to measure the heart rate with a step of 30cm in height with a metronome with a beat at 15 steps, per minute and increased by 5 steps every minute for 5 stages or until 80% of the maximum estimated heart rate was reached. The results demonstrated that the Chester Step technique is a valid predictor of aerobic capacity in males and females from a wide range of ages and fitness levels.

The following study is to establish whether there is an increase in the heart rate of healthy female individuals.

Methodology

The method used for the study was quantitative, this was chosen rather than a qualitative as this deals with facts and figures and is an investigatory type of study. This can be either experimental or non experiment. Experimental is the method used in this study which looks at cause and effect, and involves dependent and independent variables. (Balnaves and Caputi, 2001) A qualitative study can be described as interpretive which deals with personal thoughts and feelings (Flick, 2009).

The participants for this study were recruited from the University of Huddersfield which consisted of seven female students. Ethical approval was not applied for or granted, however all information, and documented data was kept private and
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