Elie Wiese's Dangerous and Frightening Life in Night Essays

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During 1944, Europe was a very dangerous place to grow up in. Adolf Hitler,who was the leader of Nazi Germany had a vendetta to take out the Jewish inhabitants of Europe and all over the world. So being a Jew in any European country was a constant struggle of persecution and fear, because Hitler had absolutely no remorse and would do whatever it took to take out the Jewish religion.

Elie Wiesel was a young boy growing up in the small town of Sighet, Hungary. He was very religious and spent much of his own time studying the Talmud and reading into the Jewish religion. He was an ambitious character and had very little hate for anyone, he also was very open minded and very compassionate for all those around him. But when the Nazis first
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During 1944, Europe was a very dangerous place to grow up in. Adolf Hitler,who was the leader of Nazi Germany had a vendetta to take out the Jewish inhabitants of Europe and all over the world. So being a Jew in any European country was a constant struggle of persecution and fear, because Hitler had absolutely no remorse and would do whatever it took to take out the Jewish religion.

Elie Wiesel was a young boy growing up in the small town of Sighet, Hungary. He was very religious and spent much of his own time studying the Talmud and reading into the Jewish religion. He was an ambitious character and had very little hate for anyone, he also was very open minded and very compassionate for all those around him. But when the Nazis first take his family to the ghettos that they moved all Jews of Sighet too, he first began to hate and feel the pain of persecution. He was then also separated from his mother Sarah, and his three sisters Hilda, Beatrice, and Tzipora when he and his father were sent to Auschwitz where his inmate number was “A-7713”. During his time at this concentration camp he first began to question his belief in God and his belief in the good of humanity. Elie survived the Holcaust but he had suffered the horrors of watching people die right in front of him, and the loss of religion and his family.

A major contributor to the religious spirituality of Elie was the handyman of the town of Sighet, Moshe the Beadle. Moshe taught Elie much about the Jewish

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