Emmel's Military Strategy

807 Words4 Pages
The idea of amphibious warfare became relevant in the United States in the 1930s, when the Landing Vehicle Tracked was first designed, a marvel of its time. The amphibious doctrine prior to World War II lacked any substance due to different influences and operational flaws. Service parochialism and a lack of needed resources often led to poor tactics when talking about an amphibious campaign; However, during World War II, dedicated U.S. military personnel were able to overcome obstacles to reach campaign objectives.The evolving amphibious warfare will be presented from the perspective of Lieutenant Colonel David Emmel. From the time of the Revolutionary war until the 20th century, primarily the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps have conducted operations…show more content…
Government downsized the military budget, in hopes to regulate the nation’s economy. As a result, the resources available dwindled, and each of the branches developed a plan that concentrated on specific efforts for production. Emmel discusses the distinct plans of each branch, and how it hurt the collective efforts of the military. This reduction in military services drove the branches further away from each other, and effectively increased the divide between collective efforts required for an amphibious campaign. The Marine Corp struggled in their own efforts at this time, as the budget constraints resulted in failed missions. They simply did not have enough manpower to seize lands. As a replacement for the lack of funds, the Marine Corps primary objective was placed in the hands of Major General Commandant John A. Lejeune. Emmel goes on to explain how placing an entire branch’s efforts on a single Commander’s tactics is not conducive to successful campaigns. It wasn’t until the Navy and Army participated in Joint Overseas Expeditions that cooperation developed and the amphibious doctrine moved in a positive direction (Emmel, 63). From the mid 1930s up until the brink of World War II, the U.S. military worked together, in hopes of forming a strengthened doctrine that would succeed in the toughest of conditions, such as World War…show more content…
military to build a strong doctrine prior to World War II, such as the implementations of Joint Overseas Expeditions and Fleet Training Exercises. Emmel strongly believed that the preparation into a strong doctrine led to the U.S. victory in World War II: “By 1942, amphibious doctrine had been developed to a point where it could be executed successfully, but not without numerous challenges that would have to be overcome by Admiral (Ernest Joseph) King’s ‘initiative of the subordinate’,promoted in the doctrine and fostered during the joint exercises prior to World War II.” Emmel goes on to elaborate about the issues that the various branches faced, and how they were able to move past them and towards an effective amphibious doctrine. The success (according to Emmel) was described as the effectively executed plans, Operations Watchtower and Torch. He uses these historic operations in Guadalcanal and French North Africa as the measurement of the growth and success of the amphibious
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