Eng2602

2602 Words Apr 3rd, 2015 11 Pages
Antonette

Assignment 01

ENG2602

Table of Content

A. Prose: Fiction Assignment. 1) Introduction to theme 2) Poetic techniques 3) Language to create meaning 4) Creation of character 5) Manipulation of tone and diction

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B. Persuasive Prose: Advertisements Bibliography Plagriasm document

Page 4 – 5 Page 6 Page 7

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Assignment 01

ENG2602

A. Prose: Fiction Assignment Midnight’s Children is written by Salman Rashied, who was born in Bombay, India but lives in England. This is an English novel written in the first person narrative that is from the perspective of Saleem Sinia. Reading the passage it is quite clear that the theme here is Saleem Sinia’s attitude towards and the significance of India’s
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Line six ‘India’s arrival at independence,’ (Rushdie, 1982) show possessive presupposition. The (‘s) shows that it is India which arrived at its independence and the significant history it made throughout the world in this act. In lines nine and ten, ‘blandly saluting clocks’; ‘hand-cuffed to history’; ‘destinies indissolubly’ (Rushdie, 1982), the use of Personification is used to describe Saleem’s unpleasant and sensitive reaction to the relationship he has been thrown into and has to accept as well as that it cannot be ended, Saleem's bound to his country’s history and forever linked to’ the day India’s arrival at independence’ (Rushdie, 1982) The theme of India set in the post-colonial history to examine both the effect of indigenous and nonindigenous cultures on the Indian mind and in light of Indian independence. This is not only Saleem’s story but also the story of India. There is conflict between the writer, Saleem Sinia and his country, India. We see this in line ten ‘hand-cuffed to history’; ‘destinies indissolubly chained,’ and ‘heavily embroiled in Fate.’ (Rushdie, 1982). India, a country divided by its independence, is characterised by turmoil. In becoming independent India was spilt in two, Pakistan in the North and India in the South. The dynamics

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