Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age

12587 Words Oct 30th, 2010 51 Pages
Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age (Free Executive Summary) http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11896.html

Free Executive Summary
Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age James Waldo, Herbert S. Lin, and Lynette I. Millett, Editors, Committee on Privacy in the Information Age, National Research Council ISBN: 978-0-309-10392-3, 456 pages, 6 x 9, hardback (2007)

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Economic approaches to the question have centered around the value, in economic terms, of privacy, both in its role in the information needed for efficient markets and in the value of information as a piece of property. Sociological approaches to the study of privacy have emphasized the ways in which the collection and use of personal information have reflected and reinforced the relationships of power and influence between individuals, groups, and institutions within society.


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Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age http://books.nap.edu/catalog/11896.html



ENGAGING PRIV ACY AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A DIGITAL AGE

Key to any discussion of privacy is a clear specification of what is at stake (what is being kept private) and the parties against which privacy is being invoked (who should not be privy to the information being kept private). For example, one notion of privacy involves confidentiality or secrecy of some specific information, such as preventing disclosure of an individual’s library records to the government or to one’s employer or parents. A second notion of privacy involves anonymity, as reflected
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