Enron: Need To Be Stricter Regulations And Accountability

1188 WordsJan 11, 20185 Pages
There are a number of appalling facets about the 2005 documentary Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room. This film details the rise and collapse of one of the most successful companies in modern times in the United States, and demonstrates a culture of debauchery that seemingly extended beyond its doors to encompass aspects of politics, legislation, banking, and general accounting principles and practices. In that respect, it is not without difficulty that the prudent viewer can determine just what the chief injustices were that the company begat during its nearly 20 year history. The real losers in this story have to be its employees, many of whom lost jobs, medical benefits, and retirement packages as the company pronounced its bankruptcy. It did so, however, in a fashion in which the viewer's natural proclivities of passion are to focus on the exceedingly cowardly and shameful way in which top management supervised the bankruptcy, while maximizing profits and minimizing their own personal damages until, of course, they were hit with criminal indictments. If the most troubling aspect of Enron was the way in which its employees were treated losing jobs, stocks, health and retirement benefits in the wake of its dissolution, then it is possible to backtrack from this event to list the many problems provided by the men that ran the company that allowed for such a travesty to happen. The duplicitous, and in some cases outright iniquitous business practices of this
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