Era of Prohibition in THe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1473 Words 6 Pages
A Time of Grieving
With its increase in organized crime, notorious icons, and unhealthy lifestyle, the Era of Prohibition represented the Roaring Twenties which F. Scott Fitzgerald vividly portrayed in The Great Gatsby.
Alcoholic beverages were illegal in the Roaring Twenties, which caused many Americans to develop hidden bars or speakeasies to drink their alcoholic beverages. The number of speakeasies increased tremendously when the Prohibition Act was established. The high number of speakeasies caused organized activity to increase during the Roaring Twenties. “Speakeasies for illicit drinking sprang up, and organized crime activity increased…” (Hutchinson Encyclopedia). Americans during the Roaring Twenties knew that alcohol was
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A Time of Grieving
With its increase in organized crime, notorious icons, and unhealthy lifestyle, the Era of Prohibition represented the Roaring Twenties which F. Scott Fitzgerald vividly portrayed in The Great Gatsby.
Alcoholic beverages were illegal in the Roaring Twenties, which caused many Americans to develop hidden bars or speakeasies to drink their alcoholic beverages. The number of speakeasies increased tremendously when the Prohibition Act was established. The high number of speakeasies caused organized activity to increase during the Roaring Twenties. “Speakeasies for illicit drinking sprang up, and organized crime activity increased…” (Hutchinson Encyclopedia). Americans during the Roaring Twenties knew that alcohol was prohibited, but they continued to use alcohol as a way to fit in. Speakeasies were used in a negative way, because they caused lower, middle and upper class Americans to drink irresponsibly. Many speakeasies in the Roaring Twenties were being supplied with alcoholic beverages by bootleggers. These bootleggers gained enormous amounts of power and wealth for selling alcohol illegally to the speakeasies’ owners. “Those who supplied the bootleggers and the bartenders with the liquor were ‘real’ criminals by anybody's definition. And since the illegal liquor was one of the biggest businesses in the country, they became increasingly rich and powerful criminals” (Cohen). The speakeasies increased the amount of alcohol, which led to more people
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