Erasmus of Rotterdam in Praise of Folly Essay

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The works of the Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus, often titled the
Praise of Folly, Erasmus’s seminal pre-Reformation essay examines aspects of Church teaching as well as aspects of worship which Erasmus deems worthy of the biting satire he utilises
Erasmus was unrelenting in his criticism of pedantry, sophistry and demagoguery among both clerical and secular figures.
Rediscovery of Aristotle and the birth of humanism in the renaissance
The influence of Erasmus on humanism during this time was so great as to ensure that Northern Renaissance humanism came to be labelled Erasmian. A movement which, unlike its Italian counterpart and predecessor, would place faith and piety at the centre of theology and would place a large emphasis on ad
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The works of the Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus, often titled the
Praise of Folly, Erasmus’s seminal pre-Reformation essay examines aspects of Church teaching as well as aspects of worship which Erasmus deems worthy of the biting satire he utilises
Erasmus was unrelenting in his criticism of pedantry, sophistry and demagoguery among both clerical and secular figures.
Rediscovery of Aristotle and the birth of humanism in the renaissance
The influence of Erasmus on humanism during this time was so great as to ensure that Northern Renaissance humanism came to be labelled Erasmian. A movement which, unlike its Italian counterpart and predecessor, would place faith and piety at the centre of theology and would place a large emphasis on ad fontes, to the sources of Christian theology and biblical and patristic sources (Parrish article)
Erasmus, while generally foccussing his critiques on the elites of European society, also speaks of the importance of education with particular regard to how education is the best way to fight the pervasiveness of public opinion, which criticises with particular venom in The Abbot and the Learned Woman.
‘for all it brilliant rhetorical fanfare, Folly’s proem is a reworking of a thoroughly medieval topos, the revival and nature of nature and man in the springtime’. (Clarence H Miller
Historian Johan Huizinga, in his Erasmus and the Age of the Reformation, recognized Erasmus's desire for simplicity:
He found society, and especially religious life,
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