Essay On The Alabama Election

1298 WordsDec 19, 20176 Pages
In a stunning upset, the deep red state voted for the first Democratic Senator in more than two and a half decades in a slim victory, giving the Democrat party momentum heading into the 2018 election while wounding a divided GOP. The ugliest special election for Alabama’s Senate seat to fill the seat formerly held by Attorney General Jeff Session drew national attention after The Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/woman-says-roy-moore-initiated-sexual-encounter-when-she-was-14-he-was-32/2017/11/09/1f495878-c293-11e7-afe9-4f60b5a6c4a0_story.html?utm_term=.877b70020e5b) reported four women alleged Republican Roy Moore of sexual allegations, saying Moore in his 30s pursued them as teenagers. Moore denied the…show more content…
We have shown the country the way that we can be unified.” Jones added, “At the end of the day, this entire race has been about dignity and respect. This campaign has been about the rule of law," he said. "This campaign has been about common courtesy and decency and making sure everyone in this state, regardless of which zip code you live in, is gonna get a fair shake in life." Moore, in a two minute speech, refused to concede, telling supporters in Montgomery “it’s not over” while mentioning the possibility of a recount. “When the vote is this close, it’s not over,” Moore told supporters at his election night rally. “Part of the problem with this campaign is that we’ve been painted in an unfavorable and unfaithful light. We’ve been put in a hole." He concluded: "Let this process play out.” (-- removed HTML --) (-- removed HTML --) Roy Moore: "It's not over. And it's going to take some time" (-- removed HTML --) https://t.co/UDrNqsdtZ8 (-- removed HTML --) (-- removed HTML --) pic.twitter.com/wdm9d8GvEn (-- removed HTML --) (-- removed HTML --) — POLITICO (@politico) (-- removed HTML --) December 13, 2017 (-- removed HTML --) (-- removed HTML --) (-- removed HTML --) (-- removed HTML --) A recount can only be considered under Alabama election laws if the margin of victory is close — 0.5%. With 100% reporting, Jones won the race with 1.5-point gap (49.9-48.4 percent or 671,151 votes to 650,436 votes), a margin
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