Essay On The Impact Of 1968

1467 Words6 Pages
THE IMPACT OF 1968
The world revolution of 1968 of course primarily concerned a series of major political issues: the hegemony of the United States and its world policies, which had led it into the Vietnam war; the relatively passive attitude of the Soviet Union, which the 1968 revolutionaries saw as "collusion" with the United States; the inefficacy of the traditional Old Left movements in opposing the status quo. In retrospect, 1968, the year of global revolt halfway between the end of World War II and the end of the Cold War, looked like a failed revolution. Nonetheless, the impacts of 1968 formulated ever gradually progressing definitions of today's world-system.

The change protagonists attributed for in the belief of a common cause,
…show more content…
The belief among the protestors that the Old Left was deluded up with the establishment and had become an obstacle to the stimulus of social change led to the inception of the New Left. Moreover, its improvisations formulated the upheavals to be existentialist in nature with an aim to solidify humanity. Thus, arose the revolutionary movements focus on various social issues such as peace activism, anti-racism, feminism, environmentalism and so on. These issues were of a social trend rather than political or economic one. They were not trying to reform the system. They wanted to dismantle the corporate system they have concluded had failed them.

Some of these student groups became a major part of the New Left, a broad-based political movement that challenged existing forms of authority, while others embraced a counterculture that promoted sexual liberation and unabashed drug use. Moreover, the escalation of protests intensified to be inclusive of other movements who sought to seize the opportunity to broadcast their own interests. These movements were met with anti-activist out lashes from the Conservative side of the society alternating the protests to escalate into
Get Access