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Essay On Violating Japanese American Rights

Decent Essays
Violating the Rights of an American After an Act of Terrorism Japanese American’s for the most part lived their lives in America as any other citizen; that is until the bombing of Pearl Harbor occurred. After the Japanese military attacked the U.S. without warning, the American people, as well as the government, became suspicious of those of Japanese descent. The thought that they could be spies, or terrorists, was a completely rational fear after what had occurred. What wasn’t rational, were the consequences suffered by those of Japanese descent living in America. On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 granting the War Department broad powers to create military exclusion areas. Although the order did not identify any particular group, in practice it was used almost exclusively to intern Americans of Japanese descent. By 1943, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans had been forced from their homes and moved to camps in remote inland areas of the United States. People of Japanese descent were singled out despite the fact that this order did not only apply to them. They were forced to sell their belongings and…show more content…
U.S. constitution were violated. After 9/11, the government took a different approach. Instead of violating the rights of people of Middle Eastern descent, the government took preemptive measures to ensure fair treatment and equality. They emphasized the illegality of discrimination. These individuals were educated on what their rights were in an effort to reduce the likelihood of abuse, mistreatment, or discrimination. Instead of taking away from the lives of those who physically resembled the terrorists who attacked them, they tried to protect them. Instead of making their lives worse, they tried to make them better. Instead of responding to one act of violence with another, they tried to prevent retaliation. Perhaps the government learned from the way they handled the last attack on U.S.
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