Essay of Comparison between The Tiger and The Lamb, poems by William Blake

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Essay of Comparison between The Tiger and The Lamb, poems by William Blake "The Tiger" and "The Lamb" were poems by William Blake, a poet who lived in the 18th century. In this essay I am going to compare the two poems and examine links between them relating to rhymes, patterns and words used. Blake's background relates on the poems he wrote, and many of his works reflected his early home life. Blake in his childhood was an outcast, a loner, and didn't have many friends. His family believed very strongly in God and were extremely pious Christians but did not agree with the teachings of the church, so young William Blake often was made to think about God and his teachings during his studies. Because his parents were rebels…show more content…
In "The Lamb" the poem is mainly very well structured and flows. In the first verse it has the questions and in the second verse it has all the answers. If you were only to look at the poem briefly you would believe it was a children's poem, a hopscotch poem or playground chant, until you remember that Blake could not have known these as he did not attend school. The reader would think this because of the simple vocabulary, and also if you notice, the poem uses soft alliteration -- "little lamb" -- this gave a much softer feel to the poem, obviously putting one in mind of children and their innocence. Blake was a very holy and pious person. He often out biblical discourse into many of his poems, as I have stated before. I found some plain biblical tones in "The Lamb" -- the next quotation shows this point. "He is meek, and he is mild . . . became a little child". This quotation is from the New Testament, where God was forgiving, whereas in the Old Testament God was believed to punish people for their sins i.e. Noah and the Ark, in which God drowns the entire human race apart from Noah and his family. The fact that there is biblical content in "The Lamb" is inspiring and was maybe meant to give a sense of hope. The lack of biblical discussion in "The Tiger" gives the reader a sense of lack if reprieve, lack of hope and a sense of the "prison" of the world and all

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